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And so does my pussycat, Clary



I

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
  And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
  And auld lang syne?

    For auld lang syne, my dear,
        For auld lang syne,
    We'll tak a cup o' kindnes yet
        For auld lang syne!

II

And surely you'll be your pint-stoup,
  And surely I'll be mine;
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet
   For auld lang syne!

III

We twa hae run about the braes,
  And pu'd the gowans fine;
But we've wandered mony a weary fit
  Sin auld lang syne.

IV

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
  Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
  Sin auld lang syne!

V

And there's a hand, my trusty  fiere,
  And gie's a hand o'thine;
And we'll take a right guid willie-waught
  For auld lang syne!

    For auld lang syne, my dear,
               For auld lang syne,
     We'll take a cup o'kindness yet
      For auld lang syne!



According to Chambers Scots Dictionary, a "willie-waught" is " a hearty
drink of any strong liquor."

An Oxford edition of Burns (1904, ed. J. Logie Robertson), has an
indispensable glossary.  Ursula Rempel beat me to the "hearty drink," but I
can add that "fiere" means "brother."  "Pu'd the gowans" means "picked the
daisies," and "paidled i' the burn," is "paddled in the stream."

Sylvia

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