misssylviadrake (misssylviadrake) wrote,
misssylviadrake
misssylviadrake

Jimmy Carter Rock & Roll President -- do see it -- what we longed for for 4 years ...

In spirit of my previous blogs, here is something I fear my readers might overlook, only it's a movie instead of an essay.



I strongly recommend seeing JC Rock & Roll President. This review will give you the gist of it and why you will so enjoy it:

https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/jimmy-carter-rock-and-roll-president-movie-review-2020

It is a film which shows a good man who meant well and did a lot of good things but was done in by his own goodness had an odd effects on me: it made me sad, brought tears to my eyes when I thought of what replaced him. Reagan took us down the road that has lead us to vast inequalities, was the first to put in charge of agencies people intended to destroy them or who knew nothing about the fields the agency was to take care of -- he set up the death squads, and yes with his genial smile behind the curtain allowed the growth of militias and fascism -- as he did nothing for the whites who voted for him on the same grounds as they voted for Trump.

So the end of the film where you see how Carter refused to do anything violent to retrieve the hostages and bought it on himself by supporting the Shah (and inviting him to the US to go to hospital) is very sad. He was humiliated-- all the while he actually succeeded in bringing them home safe, unharmed, with not a gun shot -- during his four years no one anywhere was bombed, no squad killing, no drones, no wars. But until then -- about 7/8s of the film it's a portrait of him, of his his connection to musical bands -- and the church with them -- was part of what propelled him into the presidency.

The argument of the film was his sincere connection with these various left-liberal and often church-connected musical groups was a basis for his win. They raised money, gave money, created an atmosphere around him. And for him it was not a show. We saw how he defied the Georgia culture and establishment when he, his wife and children actively integrated with Black people in Plains and then again as Governor. He did win -- showing the Blueness of Georgia before Stacey Abrams proved it.

Not incidentally part of the enjoyment and fun of the film are the groups who perform. We see that in Georgia he was the first for integration and how the White House insofar as entertainment went and some positions Black Americans were central. The choices of songs was much better than the bland Ken Burns and were contextualized for real.


As Robert Daniels says, Wharton’s “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President” is fresh water in the middle of a desert. It’s a fun soulful documentary that’s rarely ever invasive, depicting the type of statesman we’re sorely missing today.

It's available on Amazon Prime Video.

See also Glenn Kenny of the New York Times. The Trailer:




Ellen
Tags: democracy, freedom of speech, human rights, presidential campaign, social democracy, us social behavior
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